Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid) daily dose

Vitamin B-9, also called folate, is important in red blood cell formation and for healthy cell growth and function. It’s also important for the developing fetus during pregnancy. Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate.

Folic acid has been shown to work together with vitamins B-6 and B-12 to control elevated blood levels of homocysteine, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease. However, there’s no clear evidence that folic acid can prevent or treat heart disease. Studies do indicate that folate or folic acid can help prevent anemia during pregnancy and reduce the risk of neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Some research also suggests that folate may reduce the risk of breast, cervical, pancreatic and colon cancers — particularly among people who consume alcohol. However, folic acid supplementation currently isn’t specifically recommended for the prevention or treatment of cancer.

Vitamin B9 (Folate Folic Acid) daily dose

AgeFolic Acid (Vitamin B9)
μg DFE/day
0 - 6 months80
7-11 months80
1-3 years160
4-6 years200
7-9 years300
10-18 years
Males
400
10-18 years
Females
400
Males
19 - 65 years
400
Females
19-50 years
(pre- menopausal)
400
Females
51-65 years
(menopausal)
400
65 + years Males400
65 + years Females400
Pregnancy600
Lactation500

Vitamin B9 (Folate Folic Acid) Food sources: citrus juices and fruits, beans, nuts, seeds, liver, dark green leafy vegetables, and fortified breads and cereals.

Foods High in Vitamin B9 (Folate)

FoodAmount(μg)
Asparagus0,5 cup120
Brussels sprouts0,5 cup116
Black-eyed peas0,5 cup102
Spinach, cooked0,5 cup99
Romaine lettuce0,5 cup86
Lima beans0,5 cup71
Peas0,5 cup70
Collard greens,
cooked
0,5 cup56
Sweet potato0,5 cup43
Broccoli0,5 cup43
Cantaloupe0,5 whole100
Orange juice1 cup87
Orange1 whole59
Breakfast cereals1 cup100-400
Oatmeal0,5 cup97
Wheat germ0,5 cup80
Wild rice0,5 cup37