Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) daily dose

Vitamin B-6 is needed to help your body use protein, form red blood cells and maintain brain function.
Serious deficiencies of vitamin B-6 are rare, but they can increase your level of homocysteine, and potentially boost your risk of heart disease and stroke. High doses of vitamin B-6 have been touted as a treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome and premenstrual syndrome. But studies have generally not supported the effectiveness of this treatment in relieving these conditions. In addition, large daily doses of the vitamin have been associated with neurological problems, such as numbness in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy), and skin lesions.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) daily dose

Age Vitamin B 6
mg/day
0 - 6 months0.1
7-11 months0.3
1-3 years0.5
4-6 years0.6
7-9 years1.0
10-18 years
Males
1.3
10-18 years
Females
1.2
Males
19 - 65 years
1.3 (19-50 yrs)
1.7 (50 + yrs)
Females
19-50 years
(pre- menopausal)
1.3
Females
51-65 years
(menopausal)
1.5
65 + years Males1.7
65 + years Females1.5
Pregnancy1.9
Lactation2.0

A deficiency of vitamin B6 alone is uncommon because it usually occurs in association with a deficit in other B-complex vitamins.

Vitamin B6 Food sources: fortified and enriched grains, whole-grain products, poultry, fish, soybeans, nuts, pea,s and bananas.

Foods High in Vitamin B6

FoodAmount(mg)
Liver3 oz0.8
Salmon3 oz0.7
Other fish3 oz0.6
Chicken3 oz0.4
Ham3 oz0.4
Hamburger3 oz0.4
Veal3 oz0.4
Pork3 oz0.3
Beef3 oz0.2
Egg1 each0.3
Split peas0,5 cup0.6
Dried beans, cooked0,5 cup0.4
Banana1 whole0.6
Avocado0,5 cup0.4
Watermelon1 cup0.3
Turnip greens0,5 cup0.7
Brussels sprouts0,5 cup0.4
Potato1 whole0.2
Sweet Potato0,5 cup0.2
Carrots0,5 cup0.2
Peas0,5 cup0.1