Vitamin B3 (Niacin) daily dose

Vitamin B-3, commonly known as niacin, is one of the eight B complex vitamins that help your body convert food to energy. Niacin also helps improve blood circulation and cholesterol levels.
In high doses, niacin can reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol and triglycerides and raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol. Studies show niacin may also slow the development of atherosclerosis when used with other cholesterol-lowering drugs, diet and exercise. However, in the doses needed for these effects (usually greater than 1,000 mg/day), niacin can cause liver damage. Therefore, high-dose intakes should be considered a prescribed medication, not a vitamin, and taken under a doctor’s supervision.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) daily dose

AgeNiacin (a)
mg NE/day
0 - 6 months2 (b)
7-11 months4
1-3 years6
4-6 years8
7-9 years12
10-18 years
Males
16
10-18 years
Females
16
Males
19 - 65 years
16
Females
19-50 years
(pre- menopausal)
14
Females
51-65 years
(menopausal)
14
65 + years Males16
65 + years Females14
Pregnancy18
Lactation17

Niacin
(a) NE = niacin equivalents, 60-to-1 conversion factor for tryptophan to niacin.
(b) Preformed niacin.

Vitamin B3 food sources: lean meats, poultry, fish, organ meats, brewer’s yeast, peanuts and peanut butter.

Foods High in Vitamin B3

FoodAmount(mg)
Liver3 oz14.0
Tuna0,5 cup10.3
Turkey3 oz9.5
Chicken3 oz7.9
Salmon3 oz6.9
Veal3 oz5.2
Beef (round steak)3 oz5.1
Pork3 oz4.5
Haddock3 oz2.7
Scallops3 oz1.1
Peanuts1 oz4.9
Asparagus0,5 cup1.5
Wheat germ1 oz1.5
Brown rice0,5 cup1.2
Noodles, enriched0,5 cup1.0
Rice, white, enriched0,5 cup1.0
Bread, enriched1 slice0.7
Milk1 cup1.9
Cottage Cheese0,5 cup2.6