Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) daily dose

Co-enzyme functions in metabolism of carbohydrates and branched-chain amino acids. Deficiency: Beri-beri, polyneuritis, and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Vitamin B1: Food sources of thiamin include enriched, fortified and whole-grain products, such as bread, rice, pasta, tortillas and cereals, and beef liver and pork.

Vitamin B1 daily dose

AgeThiamin mg/day
0 - 6 months0.2
7-11 months0.3
1-3 years0.5
4-6 years0.6
7-9 years0.9
10-18 years
Males
1.2
10-18 years
Females
1.1
Males
19 - 65 years
1.2
Females
19-50 years
(pre- menopausal)
1.1
Females
51-65 years
(menopausal)
1.1
65 + years Males1.2
65 + years Females1.1
Pregnancy1.4
Lactation1.5

Thiamin  (vitamin  B1,  aneurin)  deficiency  results  in  the  disease  called  beri-beri,  which  has been classically considered to exist in dry (paralytic) and wet (oedematous) forms. Beri-beri  occurs  in  human-milk-fed  infants  whose  nursing  mothers  are  deficient.  It  also  occurs  in adults  with  high  carbohydrate  intakes  mainly  from  milled  rice  and  with  intakes  of  anti-thiamin  factors.  Beri-beri  is  still  endemic  in  Asia.  In  relatively  industrialized  nations,  the neurologic  reflections  of  Wernicke-Korsakoff   syndrome   are   frequently   associated   with chronic alcoholism with limited food consumption. Some cases of thiamin deficiency have been  observed  with  patients  who  are  hypermetabolic,  are  on   parenteral   nutrition,   are undergoing chronic renal dialysis, or have undergone a gastrectomy.

Foods High in Vitamin B1

FoodAmount(mg)
Pork Roast3 oz0.8
Beef3 oz0.4
Ham3 oz0.4
Liver3 oz0.2
Sunflower seeds0,5 cup0.7
Peanuts0,5 cup0,1
Almonds0,5 cup0,1
Bran Flakes1 cup0.6
Macaroni1 cup0.2
Rice1 cup0.2
Bread1 slice0.1
Peas0,5 cup0.3
Lima Beans0,5 cup0.2
Corn0,5 cup0.1
Broccoli0,5 cup0.1
Potato1 whole0.1
Orange juice1 cup0.2
Orange1 whole0.1
Avocado0.5 whole0.1