Recommended daily intake of iodine

At  present,  the  only  physiologic  role  known  for  iodine  in  the  human  body  is  in  the synthesis of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland.
Dietary sources The iodine content of food depends on the iodine content of the soil in which it is grown. The iodine present in the upper crust of earth is leached by glaciation and repeated flooding and is carried  to  the  sea.  Sea  water  is,  therefore,  a  rich  source  of  iodine.  The  seaweed  located near coral reefs has an inherent biologic capacity to concentrate iodine from the sea. The reef fish  which  thrive  on  seaweed  are  rich  in  iodine.

Recommended daily intake of iodine

AgeIodine (o)
μg/day
0 - 6 months15 (p) μg/kg/day
7-11 months135
1-3 years 75
4-6 years110
7-9 years100
Males 10 - 18 years135 (10-11 yrs)
110 (12 + yrs)
Females 10 - 18 years140 (10-11 yrs)
100 (12 + yrs)
Males 19 - 65 years130
Females 19 - 50 years 110
Females 51 - 65 years110
Males 65 + years130
Females 65 + years110
Pregnancy
First trimester
200
Pregnancy
Second trimester
200
Pregnancy
Third trimester
200
Lactation
0-3 months
200
Lactation
4-6 months
200
Lactation
7-12 months
200

(o) Data expressed on a per kg body weight basis is sometimes preferred, and this data is as follows:
premature infants = 30 μg/kg/day
infants 0-12 months  =  19 μg/kg/day
children 1 – 6 years = 6 μg/kg/day
children 7 – 11  =  4 μg/kg/day
adolescents and adults 12 + years = 2 μg/kg/day
pregnancy and lactation  =  3.5 μg/kg/day
(p) In view of the high variability in body weights at these ages the RNIs are expressed as μg/kg body weight/day.

Average iodine content of foods (in μg/g)

FoodFresh basis
Mean
Fresh basis
Range
Fish (fresh water)3017–40
Fish (marine)832163–3180
Shellfish798308–1300
Meat5027–97
Milk4735–56
Eggs9393
Cereal grains4722–72
Fruits1810–29
Legumes3023–36
Vegetables2912–201