Foods high in vitamins and minerals

Vitamins and minerals are substances your body needs to grow properly, function normally and stay healthy. It’s possible — and highly recommended — that you get these substances from the foods you eat. However, it sometimes can be difficult to get the recommended amount of some vitamins and minerals from diet alone. That’s why it’s not unusual to hear that taking a multivitamin or other supplement on a daily basis can make good sense.

Vitamins and mineralsEasy access
Vitamin A/
beta carotene
One small carrot (5 inches) provides about
6,000 international units (IU) of vitamin A.
Vitamin B-3
(niacin)
Three ounces of tuna (canned in water)
has 11 milligrams (mg) of niacin.
Vitamin B-6One medium banana contains about 0.4
mg of vitamin B-6.
Vitamin B-9
(folate/folic acid)
Half a cup (4 ounces) of cooked spinach
contains 130 micrograms (mcg) of folate.
Vitamin B-12Three ounces of salmon contains about 5
mcg of vitamin B-12.
Vitamin COne medium orange has about 70 mg of
vitamin C.
Vitamin DOne cup (8 ounces) of fortified milk con-
tains 100 IU of vitamin D
Vitamin EOne ounce of almonds (about 23 nuts) has
more than 7 mg of vitamin E.
CalciumOne cup (8 ounces) of milk contains 300
mg of calcium.
IronThree ounces of beef, pork, lamb or veal
contains 2 to 3 mg of iron.
MagnesiumOne cup of cooked spinach has 150 to 160
mg of magnesium.
PotassiumOne medium banana has 422 mg of potas-
sium. One medium baked potato (with
skin) contains 926 mg of potassium.
SeleniumOne slice of whole-wheat bread contains
10 mcg of selenium.
ZincThree ounces of lean sirloin contains 5 mg of zinc.

Foods high in vitamins and minerals

Vitamins and mineralsFood sources
Vitamin A/beta caroteneCarrots, sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, apricots, cantaloupe, liver,
egg yolks and fortified milk
Vitamin B-3 (niacin)Lean meats, poultry, fish, organ meats, brewer’s yeast, peanuts and
peanut butter
Vitamin B-6Fortified and enriched grains, whole-grain products, poultry, fish,
soybeans, nuts, pea,s and bananas
Vitamin B-9
(folate/folic acid)
Citrus juices and fruits, beans, nuts, seeds, liver, dark green leafy
vegetables, and fortified breads and cereals
Vitamin B-12Meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, eggs, dairy products and fortified cereals
Vitamin CCitrus juices and fruits, berries, tomatoes, potatoes, green and red
peppers, broccoli, and spinach
Vitamin DFatty fish (such as salmon and sardines), cod-liver oil, and fortified
milk and cereals
Vitamin EVegetable oils, wheat germ, whole-grain products, avocados and nuts
(especially almonds)
CalciumDairy products, calcium-fortified cereals and juice, greens (spinach,
bok choy, collards, kale, turnips), broccoli, green soybeans (edamame),
and fish eaten with their bones (salmon, sardines)
IronMeat, seafood, poultry, whole-grain products, beans, peas and dark
green leafy vegetables
MagnesiumNuts, legumes, whole-grain products and dark green vegetables
PotassiumCitrus fruits, apples, bananas, apricots, cantaloupe, potatoes (especial-
ly with skin), tomatoes, spinach, Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, beans,
peas and almonds
SeleniumMilk, poultry, fish, seafood, organ meats, Brazil nuts and whole-grain
products
ZincMeat, fish, poultry, liver, milk, oysters, wheat germ, whole-grain
products and fortified cereals

Fortified and Enriched Foods
These days, you may notice that a number of the products you buy at the grocery store have been “fortified” or “enriched” with certain vitamins or minerals. What does this mean?
If a food or beverage is said to be fortified, it means that one or more nutrients have been added that weren’t originally there. Enriched, on the other hand, means that the nutrients lost during processing have been added back. The Nutrition Facts list on the product label will tell you which nutrients have been added. It will also show what percentage of the Daily Value (DV) for each nutrient is met with one serving of the product.